Registration

The Hampshire County Fair Association is now accepting reservations for booths and/or space for the Hampshire County Fair. For more information, to make a reservations, or reservation deadlines contact Duane ‘Punkin’ Oates at 304-359-1144.

For Parade Info, please call Michelle Turner 304-851-7025 or email hampshirecountyfair@yahoo.com

4-H projects will be accepted in the Exhibit Building on Sunday, July 23 from 2 – 4 p.m. CLICK HERE FOR INFO

2017 Crops Building – Entries Taken From General Public

Entries will be taken Sunday, July 23, from 2-6 p.m.
Hampshire County Continuing Educational Outreach Service
Department II – For general public
Sponsored by – Hampshire County Continuing Educational Outreach Service (CEOS)

1. All articles must be the handiwork of the exhibitor and must be clean. Articles must have been completed within the last two years and be in good condition Articles which have been previously exhibited are not eligible for competition.
2. Each exhibitor is limited to ONE entry per class.
3. When there is no competition a ribbon may be given (if worthy) with corresponding money paid. If in a case no exhibits are worthy, neither ribbons nor prize money will be awarded. The decision of the judges are final.
3. Ribbons and premium money are awarded: $4 blue, $3 red and $2 white.
4. Fair officials will take every precaution for the safekeeping of exhibits after their arrival and arrangements in the building, but will not be responsible for any damage or loss that may occur.
5. Enter exhibits on Sunday, July 23, from 2 to 6 p.m. at the homemakers building on the fairgrounds.
6. Exhibits may be picked up on Saturday from 8 to 10 p.m.
7. Any entries removed before 8 p.m. on Saturday will forfeit their premium money.

Section 1 – Bread
One small loaf or 2 slices of bread on a paper plate covered with plastic wrap. Three (3) rolls or muffins on a paper plate covered with plastic wrap.
Breads
Doughnuts
Bread
Foreign breads
Rolls – white yeast and cinnamon
Biscuits
Other
Juniors – under 14

Section 2 – Pies
1/6 slice of pie on paper plate covered with plastic wrap.
Pies
One crust
One crust meringue pie
Two crust
Other
Junior – under 14

Section 3 – Cakes
Loaf and layer cakes – must be homemade. Loaf cake – one piece 6×6; Layer – one 6”wedge –shaped piece on paper plate covered with plastic wrap.
Cakes
Cupcakes
Other
Junior – under 14

Section 4 – Candy
Must be homemade, 6 pieces covered with plastic wrap on a paper plate.

Section 6 – Cookies
Must be homemade, 6 cookies on a paper plate and covered with plastic wrap.
Cookies
Brownies
Bars
Junior – under 14

Section 7 – Canned Goods
Guidelines for canning:
1. Label jars (not on bottom) with contents of jar and date (please use permanent marker). Canning must have been canned July 2016-July 2017.
2. Please do not decorate jars. Fancy packing is not encouraged.
3. Only use regulation canning jars – if any others are used they will be disqualified.
4. Contents should not be touching the lid.
5. Jars and rims must be clean and rust free.
6. Leave bans on for transporting items to the fair, however bans must be removed when presented for judging.

Fruits
Apples
Applesauce
Blackberries
Raspberries
Huckleberry
Strawberries
Cherries
Peaches
Pears
Plums

Juices
Grape
Tomato
Others

Meats
All

Vegetables
Blackeyed Peas
French Style
Green Beans
Birdeye
Hulled Bean
Lima Bean
Wax Bean
Whole Bean
Beets
Carrots
Corn
Mixed Vegetables
Peas
Peppers
Potatoes
Rhubarb
Sauerkraut
Squash
Sweet Potatoes
Red Tomatoes
Yellow Tomatoes
Other

Pickles and Relishes
Standard canning jars with vacuum-type lids must be used.
Chili Sauce
Chow Chow
Corn
Pepper Relish
Bread & Butter
Dill
Kosher
Mixed
Mustard
Sour
Sweet
Onion
Other

Jams, Jellies,
Preserves,
Marmalades, and Misc.
All preserves and jellies should be sealed with vacuum-type lids and processed in boiling water bath.

Butters – Fruit pulps cooked to semi-solid state.
Apple
Grape
Peach
Pear
Plum
Other

Jams – Almost holds its shape, but not
jelly-firm. Made from crushed or ground fruit.
Blackberry
Raspberry
Strawberry
Huckleberry
Cherry
Other

Jellies – clear jellied fruit juice.
Blackberry
Cherry
Grape
Huckleberry
Peach
Plum
Raspberry
Strawberry
Apple
Pepper

Marmalades – jelly with small pieces of citrus fruit
distributed
throughout.

Preserves – whole fruits or large pieces of fruit in a thick
syrup, slightly jellied.
Blackberry
Cherry
Grape
Huckleberry
Peach
Plum
Raspberry
Strawberry

Section 8 –
Needlework
Crocheting
Household items
Baby Articles
Dolls
Toys
Clothing Garments’
Other
Junior – under 14

Embroidery
Aprons
Crewel
Doilies
Pillows
Candle-wicking
Needle Point
Cross Stitch
Other
Juniors – under 14

Knitting
Kitchen Accessories
Clothing  Garments
Other
Junior – under 14

Needlepoint
All

Quilting
Applique quilt
Embroidery
Candle- wicking
Patch work or pieced
Machine Stitched
0ther
Junior – under 14

Afghans
All

Sewing
Clothing Garments
Household Items
Toys
Christmas Tree Skirt
Christmas Stocking
Purse/Tote bag
Other
Junior – under 14

Weaving
Pot Holders
Rugs
Stoles
Other
Junior – under 14

Section 9 – Arts
Painting (must be original art) NO Paint by numbers will be accepted!
Acrylic Painting
Charcoal Sketching
Oil Painting
Pastel Paintings
Pencil sketching
Velvet Painting
Water Color
Junior – under 14

Section 10 – Crafts
All Leather Tooling
Wood Work
Pottery
Hooking
Rugs
Bread Dough
Loom Weaving
String/Wire Art
Liquid Embroidery
Toll Painting
Wood Burning
Leather
Basket Handmade/ Decorated
Center Piece
Plastic Craft
Dolls
Candles
Christmas Tree Ornaments
Stained Glass
Hand Crafted Jewelry
Wreaths
Ceramics
Others
Junior – under 14

Section 11 –
Scrapbook – Must be 3 or more pages

Section 12 – Paper Crafts
Greeting Cards
Rubber Stamp Art
Quilling
Oragami
Papier Mache
Hand Made Paper

Section 13 -Amateur Photography
(Please note class changes).
Rules and Regulations: Each exhibit will be limited to one entry in each class. Judging will be done by the usual standards of subject matter, composition, and photographic excellence. Composition and exposure must be the work of the exhibitor, except that the developing and finishing may be done by anyone.

Buildings, color/BW
People (individuals or groups), color/BW
Landscapes, color/BW
Animals or birds, color/BW
Still Life, color/BW
Experimental, color/BW

Sections 14 –
Flowers
Exhibitors must furnish all containers. Plants should be groomed – remove dirt, dead foliage and dead flowers.
Display: A group of flowers from 5 to 10 blooms to create an attractive effect but not a decided arrangement.

Potted Plants
Specimens: Single bloom, cluster, spike or spray. Flower only is judged, not container.
Arrangement: Consists of all fresh plant material. Container or display base will be judged, also.

4-H Exhibits
4-H Exhibit Entry:
4-H project exhibits are entered into the 4-H Exhibit Building at the fairgrounds on Sunday, August 11, 2013 from 2-4 p.m.
4-H Exhibit Pick-Up:
4-H projects can be picked up on Saturday night, August 17th, from 8:00-9:00 p.m.. or on Sunday morning, August 18, from 8 – 10 a.m.
4-H Exhibit Building Hours:
The 4-H Exhibit Building is open each evening from 5 to 9 p.m.
4-H Projects Exhibit Requirements
A Complete 4-H Project Consists of:
■ Completed Project Book (turned into the WVU Extension Office by June 30, 2017)
■ Completed Activity Record (turned into the Extension Office by June 30, 2017)
■ Completed Exhibit (turned in at the fairgrounds)
■ If completing “Above and Beyond” activities in the 4-H project book, they must be documented to receive credit; documentation must include what was learned from participation.

ANIMAL SCIENCE
Veterinary Science I
The Normal Animal:
Exhibit one of the following:
1. Photographic exhibit of normal and abnormal characteristics of animals
2. Samples of leather or fur damaged by unhealthy or parasitized skin
3. Charts showing temperature, respiration, and heart rate changes under varying conditions
4. Display showing disease-preventive health procedures through the use of proper housing, nutrition and other management decisions
5. Display on the proper method of cleaning and disinfection, including safety precautions

Veterinary Science II
The Animal Disease:
Exhibit one of the following:
1. Poster display of a disease you investigated describing its causes, symptoms, effects, treatments, and any possible preventive measures
2. Display on a viral disease listing its method of transmission, symptoms, treatments, prevention, and effects it may have on an animal
3. Display giving strategic advantages and disadvantages on how to treat an external parasite infestation or prevent its occurrence
4. Display explaining a typical internal parasite prevention program

5. Display on a chemical, plant, or insecticide poison and its effects on an animal including preventive measures to be taken

Veterinary Science III
Animal Health and its
Relationship to Our World
Exhibit A display on your self-study activity. Consider the following, for example:
1. Create an exhibit about your project defining your goals, objectives, and results.
2. Create a Web site using your self-study findings.
3. Write a written report in the form of a news article, publication, or promotional flyer. Radio and television offer additional opportunities.

Beef, Swine, Rabbit,
Goat and Sheep:
Horse: Exhibit animal at the fair. Record guides are due by Aug. 11.
Poultry: Educational Exhibit or poster of 4-H’ers choice in Exhibit building
Dog: Educational exhibit or poster displayed in Exhibit building.
Cat: Educational exhibit or poster displayed in Exhibit building
Rabbit: Exhibit animal at the fair
Pets: Educational exhibit or poster displayed in Exhibit building.

PLANT SCIENCE & CROPS PROJECTS
Potatoes: Exhibit 14 of the best potatoes each year
Strawberry Planting: Exhibit Late August field score.
Strawberry Harvesting: Exhibit 4 quarts of berries
Flower Arranging: Exhibit Arrangement with explanation of occasion and design.
Meet the Plants: Exhibit Poster showing the uses of different plant parts; or a plant you have propagated with a poster describing the steps used; or an exhibit you have done from the project book, with a poster explaining the procedure and results. *
Indoor Gardening: Exhibit Collection of plants propagated by the four different propagation methods and two posters showing at least two of the methods; or materials and written procedures for transplanting a pot bound plant; or a completed experiment from the project book with a poster explaining the procedure and results. *
Vegetable Gardening: Exhibit Transplants you have grown with a poster showing the steps involved; or garden and calendar plan with information needed to design a vegetable garden; or container-grown vegetable plants with a poster explaining showing how you grew and cared for them. *
Landscape Gardening: Exhibit Completed experiment from the project book with a poster showing the procedure and results; or a story of your landscape project using pictures that show before, during and after shots; or a landscape plot plan for a new site you are going to landscape around your house, school, community; or a vase of flowers from your flower garden with your drawing or a photograph of the garden.

MECHANICAL SCIENCE
Starting Up, Tractor A: (Should be at least 14 years old and have taken the Small Engine Series).
Exhibit A display on an activity completed during your project.
Tractor Operations, Tractor B: Exhibit A display on an activity completed during your project.
Small Engine 1, 2, & 3: Exhibit two small engine activities completed during the project
Bicycling For Fun, Bicycle 1: Exhibit your bicycle and a poster or display with a story describing your favorite bicycle activity completed this year in Bicycling For Fun plus your “Pedaling Harder” activities notebook and project book.
Wheels in Motion, Bicycle 2: Exhibit your bicycle and a poster or display with a story describing your favorite bicycle activity completed this year in Wheels In Motion plus your “Pedaling Harder” activities notebook and project book.
Electricity 1, 2, 3 & 4: Exhibit two electric activities completed during the project
Rockets Away: Exhibit model rocket constructed by member and record of launches.
Wood Working 1, 2, 3 & 4: Exhibit 2 woodworking articles completed during the project

NATURAL RESOURCES &
ENVIRONMENT
Spring Wildflowers 1, 2, 3
Year 1: Exhibit 15 wildflowers labeled, dried and pressed; a seed and or fruit collection of 5 wildflowers (Requirements 3 & 4 of book)
Year 2: Exhibit 15 new wildflowers, labeled, dried, and pressed; a seed and/or fruit collection of 10 new wildflowers (Requirements 3 & 4 of book)
Year 3: Exhibit 20 new wildflowers, labeled, dried, and pressed and a seed and or fruit collection of 10 new wildflowers (Requirements 3 & 4 of book)
Summer & Fall Wild Flowers 1, 2, 3
Year 1: Exhibit 15 wildflowers labeled, dried and pressed; a seed and or fruit collection of 5 wildflowers (Requirements 3 & 4 of book)
Year 2: Exhibit 15 new wildflowers, labeled, dried, and pressed; a seed and/or fruit collection of 10 new wildflowers (Requirements 3 & 4 of book)
Year 3: Exhibit 20 new wildflowers, labeled, dried, and pressed and a seed and or fruit collection of 10 new wildflowers (Requirements 3 & 4 of book)

Entymology
Creepy Crawlies, Entomolgy I
Exhibit Insect collection of a minimum of (25) specimens, adding 25 new specimens each year
What’s Bugging You, Entomology II
Exhibit Insect collection of a minimum of (25) specimens, adding 25 new specimens each year
Dragons, Houses and Other Flies, Entomology III
Exhibit insect collection of a minimum of (25) specimens, adding 25 new specimens each
year

Tree Identification:
Year 1: Collect, press, mount and label leaves from 20 trees according to circular
Year 2 or 3: Collect, press, mount and label leaves from 20 different trees or collect, label and display 20 fruits/seeds according to circular

Forestry I-III:
Exhibit a poster or display on two forestry activities completed during the year plus your “Branching Out” activities notebook and project book.

Trapping:
Exhibit notebook of information and plaster casts of three fur-bearers’ tracks

Birds:
Exhibit photographs or drawings of the nests found or photos or samples of things made for elective activities. Example: birdhouses, birdbaths, feeding stations, etc.

Fishing for Adventure:
Exhibit two sport fishing activities completed during the project. Possible examples could include:
1. Poster showing parts of a fish
2. Poster showing at least 3 knots used in fishing
3. Exhibit of pop can reel and poster of casting record with pop can reel.
4. Display of at least 5 pieces of tackle (labeled).

Reduce, Reuse, Recycle:
Exhibit a poster, display, or notebook showing what you have learned from this project. Note, Indicate which activities you completed in the book and include evidence of completion.

Eco-Wonders, Level I
Exhibit one of the following:
1. Build an ecosystem and include information about the four elements necessary for life (page 11 of project book)
2. Display your weather log, including drawings or photos of the weather (page 21 of project book)
3. Make a display that shows and describes how you made your compost pile. Create a brochure that explains how others can compost (page 26)
4. Collect at least 3 different types of foods or clothing (fiber). Research their ingredients or raw materials. Describe some of their impacts on the environment (page 31)
5. Make a display of the camouflaged critters. Use pictures or photos. Describe how this camouflage is helpful. Make a picture with camouflaged animals hidden in it. Have people hunt for the hidden creatures. (Page 42)
6. Design a game or quiz on birds’ nests. Make flip-up panels or a rotating wheel with correct answers (page 53)

Eco-Adventures, Level II
Exhibit one of the following:
1. Map you made of local watershed or make a model of your community’s watershed. Make a key and identify features on your map. Explain what watersheds are and how they are impacted by people’s actions. (Page 11)
2. Display showing results of Acid Rain’s Effects on Plants’ experiment. Include photos and descriptions. (Page 31)
3. Display that teaches people about galls. Include real examples of galls you discovered. (Page 43)
4. Set up a testing station where people can explore seed dispersal. Make a fact sheet to give to people after they test various seeds. (Page 47)
5. Start a collection of plaster of Paris molds of identified animal tracks. (Page 53)
6. Make a wildlife habitat game. Design and build an interactive board game that helps teach people about the four habitat needs. (Page 56)

Eco-Actions, Level III
Exhibit one of the following:
1. Display of the 3 cities you chose along with their 4 elements of life. (Page 11)
2. Display your collage. Make a brochure to go along with the collage to better explain your thoughts and the meaning behind your collage selections. (Page 21)
3. Make a poster about biotechnology. List its possibilities and concerns. Attach recent news articles and quotes (Page 23)
4. Choose at least 3 products. Create a display that shows how pollution is or could have been prevented with these products. (Page 27)
5. Make a brochure or fact sheet on urban sprawl. (Page 33)
6. Make a game about insects. Have people match different parts together to create a real insect. Identify the different body parts and their uses. (Page 46)

TEEN LEADERSHIP
Create a 24×14 poster highlighting one of your teen leadership activities.

LEISURE & CULTURAL
EDUCATION
Hiking Trails:
Exhibit a Reach the Peak notebook and exhibit ideas include poster or display on essentials for a hiking trip, camping trip diary, first aid kit, CPR/First Aid steps, foods list for a hiking trip, treasure hunt using a compass, weather safety program, how to purify water, or winter survival plan
Camping Adventures:
Exhibit a Reach the Peak notebook and poster or display on Dutch oven cooking, types of knots, hiking trail cleanup, pitching a tent, campfire designs, lighting a safe fire, filtering water, micro-organisms in non-purified water, or protecting natural resources.
Backpacking Expeditions:
Exhibit a Reach the Peak notebook and poster or display on topographic maps, backpacking trip plan, hiking conditioning, camping adventures video, tent repair kit, purchasing a tent and supplies, backpacking food recipes, or camp layout.
Recreation 1:
Exhibit a collection of at least 20 of your favorite games. This may be in a file box, notebook, three-ring binder, etc.
Exploring 4-H, your Family, the World or the Arts:
Exhibit a display of completed work, attractively labeled. (Follow exhibit requirements on page 2 of the project book.
Play the Role
Exhibit one of the following:
1. A videotape of a pantomime or mime act
2. A three-page monologue based on a nursery rhyme character
3. A listing of poems and phrases helpful to actor’s vocal warm-ups
4. A two-page open scene script with two possible interpretations – compare and contrast how a lead actor could portray a character differently through physical movements
5. A costume created for a character
Becoming a Puppeteer
Exhibit one of the following:
1. A puppet (no kits) made in Become a Puppeteer
2. A collage of puppet types and history from around the world
3. A report on a puppeteer who has contributed greatly to the performing arts
4. A one-act written dialogue between two puppets
5. A videotape of your puppet show
6. A puppet created for a community service project, including the project description
Setting the Stage
Exhibit one of the following:
1. A sound-effects box for a short play, including a copy of the play marked for sound and all props needed to make sound effects labeled to go with the play
2. A homemade color wheel and light rainbow
3. A display on make-up
4. A display on light and shadow

5. A costume for a character representing a specific culture
6.A set design, costume list and prop list for a selected play, including script

HEALTH & SAFETY
First Aid in Action (Health I)
Exhibit a poster or educational display on an activity completed during the current year or your first aid kit complete with cards plus your Firs Aid in Action “More Challenges” notebook and project book.
Staying Healthy (Health 2)
Exhibit a poster or educational display on a Staying Healthy activity completed during the current year plus your Staying Healthy “More Challenges” notebook and project book.
Keeping Fit (Health 3)
Exhibit a poster or educational display on a Keeping Fit activity completed during the current year plus your Keeping Fit “More Challenges” notebook and project book.

INDIVIDUAL AND FAMILY
RESOURCES
Child Care
Growing on My Own,
Child Development I:
Exhibit a portfolio and two “things” completed in Growing on My Own activities each year. Exhibit ideas include poster or display on story masks, bloomin’ bag, morning time routine, roles you play in your family, home safety hazards and solutions, or choke-tube tester.
Growing with Others,
Child Development II:
Exhibit portfolio and three “things’ completed in Growing with Others activities each year. Exhibit ideas include poster or display on self-care plan, age-appropriate toy chart, child development puzzle, family mobile, home alone game, family rules worksheet, street-smart game, or home safety checklist.
Growing in Communities,
Child Development III:
Exhibit portfolio and three “things” completed in Growing in Communities activities each year. Exhibit ideas include poster or display on child development observation record, evaluating television programs for youths, child development career watch game, accessibility checklist, blockbuster observation record, babysitting kit, playground safety plan, or playground first aid kit.

Management
Financial Champions:
Money FUNdamentals
(Financial Champions I)
Exhibit a Portfolio of two Financial Champions activities completed during the Money Fundamentals project
Money Moves:
Exhibit a portfolio of two Financial Champions activities completed during the Money Moves project
Entrepreneurship: Be the “E” Series
Exhibit one of the following each year:
1. Trade-show type booth of your product or service
2. Prototype of your product
3. Picture story of your entrepreneurship project
4. Completed business plan
5. Journal or portfolio of how your project evolved with the record of the process
6. Marketing portion of the Business Plan featuring the name of your business and examples of marketing tools

Clothing
Clothing I, Under Construction
Display one of the following:
1. Poster or display on basic sewing kit tools with descriptions
2. A sewing machine with machine parts and purposes identified
3. Seam finishes with a comparison chart
4. A sewing project completed (e.g. pillowcase, totebag, nine-patch pillow, pajama pants, drawstring bag) in Under Construction
Clothing II, Fashion Forward
Display one of the following:
1. Poster or display on three methods of fabric construction
2. Steps in setting a product’s price
3. A sewing project completed (e.g. jacket, dress, skirt, pants, pillow cover) in Fashion Forward
4. Natural fibers versus man-made fibers
5. Pressing equipment and uses
Clothing III, Refine Design
Display one of the following: poster or display on five specialized sewing tools and their use; three new laundry products and their use; comparison between purchased item and homemade item; patterns designed for two different figure types; or a sewing project completed (e.g. jacket, vest, wall hanging, windsock, bedspread, pillow) in Refine Design

Food Preparation: All food books should have a 2-page score sheet enclosed.
Six Easy Bites (Beginner):
First Year: Six drop, molded, or bar baked cookies and recipe card, or a package of six frozen cookies. Include index card with instructions.
Second Year: Six muffins of any kind (no muffin liners) and recipe card, or one package of frozen berries. Display in freezer bag or freezer container. Include index card with instructions for cooking or defrosting. Label with name of product, quantity and date frozen.

Tasty Tidbits: (Intermediate):
First Year: A square, oblong, or round layer of cake, without frosting and recipe card, or One (1) uncooked frozen mini-pizza using pita bread, English muffin, bagel, or already prepared crust (no larger than 7” in diameter) with toppings of your choice. Meat toppings such as hamburger, sausage, bacon, etc. need to be cooked. Display on covered cardboard inside freezer bag. Include index card with instructions for cooking. Label with name or product and date frozen.
Second Year: Six (6) no-yeast, any shape pretzels (shaped, stick, or nugget) or six no-yeast rolled biscuits (no drop biscuits) and recipe card, or One (1) package of any frozen vegetable or combination vegetables. Display in freezer bag or freezer container. Include index card with instructions for cooking. Label with name of product, quantity, and date frozen.

You’re the Chef (Intermediate):
First Year: Six (6) yeast bread sticks or yeast rolls (any shape, medium size—not a sweet roll) and recipe card, or One (1) container of freezer jam. Include index card with recipe and instructions for storing. Label with name or product, quantity, and date frozen.
Second Year: A yeast bread (can be loaf, braid, but not rolls) using a specialty grain such as whole wheat, rye, oat bran, etc. or a sweet bread such as tea ring and recipe card, or One (1) jar of a canned tomato product using the Hot Pack Method for a boiling water bath canner, such as tomato juice, catsup, barbecue sauce, or salsa. Include index card with recipe and instructions for cooking or using the product. Label with name of product, quantity, and date canned
Third Year: One (1) package of a non-perishable invented snack such as a granola bar, brownie, fudge, fruit leather, popcorn snack, trail mix, etc. Exhibit must include a separate folder containing a marketing plan with product name, recipe, how it will be packaged, a package design, where it will be sold, and suggested selling price. Label should include product name, date, quantity, and serving size, or One (1) jar of canned pickles or a canned pickled product. Include index card with recipe and storage instructions. Label with name of product, quantity, and date canned. Include index card with recipe and storage instructions.

Foodworks (Advanced):
First Year: A single or double crust baked fruit pie (no graham cracker crust). (Note: Custards, cream, cream cheese frosting and fillings, and raw egg white frosting are not acceptable in an exhibit because they are highly perishable when left at room temperature.), or One (1) jar of pressure canned vegetables, meat, or combination product, such as soup, stew, spaghetti sauce with meat, etc. Include index card with recipe and instructions for cooking or using the product. Label with name of product, quantity, and date canned.
Second Year: A nonperishable international food product (such as apple strudel, French bread, Mexican wedding cakes, fortune cookies, etc.) with a separate page describing the food customs of the country where the food comes from and how this product is used in relationship to that country’s customs. (Note: Custards, cream, cream cheese frosting and fillings, and raw egg white frosting are not acceptable in an exhibit because they are highly perishable when left at room temperature.), or A table display on a country outlining food preferences, meal patterns, how nutritional needs are met, interesting customs, etc. Display should be no larger than 16” deep x 22” wide x 28” high, or One (1) package of a frozen entrée such as a casserole, hearty soup, or vegetable dish in a freezer container. Exhibit should include an index card with recipe and instructions for reheating. Containers should be labeled with name of product, quantity, and date frozen.
Third Year: A nonperishable food product for a special occasion or catered meal (such as an appetizer, holiday food, fruit cake, special occasion cake, altered recipe product, etc.) with a separate page utilizing how this product will be used at the event, or a table display for a special occasion or catered meal. The display should include a notebook outlining menu, supplies to buy, preparation schedule, equipment, table layout, etc. Display should be no larger than 16” deep x 22” wide x 29” high, or A jar or cooked jelly or a reduced sugar fruit spread. Include recipe card. Label with name of product, quantity, and date made.

COMMUNICATION ARTS
& SCIENCE
Focus on Photography,
Photography I
Exhibit two activities completed this year in Focus On Photography and your project book
Exhibit ideas include poster or display on basic camera parts and/or types, how a camera works, comparing film and digital cameras, ways to hold a camera steady, photos from My First Photo Shoot, photos showing effects of changing daylight, photos of shadow shapes, photos taken from a bird’s eye view, or photos that tell a story.
Controlling the Image,
Photography II
Exhibit two activities completed this year in Controlling the Image and your project book.
Exhibit ideas include poster or display on photos taken with different aperture settings, photos taken with different shutter speeds, photos of same subject showing different depth of field results, photos taken in low light, photos showing hard and soft light, silhouette photos, photos showing rule of thirds, photos showing different viewpoints of same subject, or close-up photos showing parts of the same subject.
Mastering Photography,
Photography III
Exhibit two activities completed this year in Mastering Photography and your project book
Exhibit ideas include poster or display on photos using telephoto lenses, photos using wide-angle lenses, photos taken with different filters, photos of same subject (1 properly exposed, 1 overexposed, 1 underexposed), photos showing dramatic lighting, photos using natural light to create a specific mood, favorite reflection photos, photos showing use of leading lines, photos showing various geometric shapes (triangles, rectangles), photos that break rules of composition, photos highlighting warm or cool colors, or photos to market a product, event, or organization.
4-H News Reporter:
In notebook, write about any media visits; add examples of your news stories and published clippings.

MISCELLANEOUS
This is 4-H: Select One:
Exhibit Choices for 3rd – 6th Grades:
1. Shoebox Picture Story
2. Three Dimensional 4-H Clover
3. Your 4-H Timeline
Exhibit Choices for 7th Grade and Above:
1. A 4-H Scrapbook
2. Clover Art
3. Your 4-H Timeline

Self-Determined:
Exhibit your project notebook and any pictures (captions, charts, samples you have made), or an educational exhibit. Nothing can be exhibited as a Self-Determined project that is representative of another project area unless you are building upon a completed series.
Citizenship I-VII
(County Project):
Exhibit a poster or educational display on any topic discussed in your project book.
Know Your State
(County Project):
Exhibit one of the following:
1. Scrapbook containing photos, brochures, handouts, and information about WV
2. Poster showing West Virginia’s State flag, bird, animal, flower, tree, and a short explanation about the pictures
An extra 5 pts. earned for displaying a WV road map.

Cloverbud Projects (County Projects):
No Activity Record Required
Cloverbud Bicycle:
Exhibit completed “Here I Am” mounted on construction paper or poster board.
Cloverbud Birds:
Make a simple bird feeder from one of the examples in your book.
Cloverbud Bugs:
Collect, mount and label five insects using the information in your project book.
Cloverbud Cat:
Completed “Meet my Cat” page in book and mount on construction paper or poster board.
Cloverbud Dog:
Completed “Meet my Dog” page in book and mount on construction paper or poster board.
Cloverbud Food:
Exhibit a poster with the food pyramid on it. Cut out pictures or draw some of the foods found in each of the five main food groups.
Cloverbud Pet:
Completed “Meet My Pet” page mounted on construction paper or poster board
Cloverbud This is 4-H:
Exhibit Completed Look at Me page mounted on construction paper or poster board (picture should be from a 4-H event)
Crops
Hampshire County Fair Departments
Crops Building – Entries Taken From General Public

Department I – Farm Products
SECTION A – Field Corn
1. Corn, 10 ears, husked
2. Ensilage Corn, 5 stalks
3. Corn for Grain, 5 stalks
4. Decorative Corn, 5 ears

SECTION B – Grains
1. Wheat, half gallon
2. Oats, half gallon
3. Rye, half gallon
4. Barley, half gallon

SECTION C – Hay
1. Alfalfa, 1/4 bale
2. Alfalfa, Grass Mixture, 1/2 bale
3. Red Clover, Grass Mixture, 1/4 bale
4. Orchard Grass, 1/2 bale
5. Timothy, 1/4 bale
6. Any Other

SECTION D – Potatoes
Exhibit 14 potatoes. Do not wash, brush lightly
1. Irish Cobbler
2. Katahdin
3. Kennebec
4. Pontiac
5. Other

SECTION E – Fruit
Exhibit 5. Classes will be made from varieties brought to exhibit
1. Apples
2. Peaches
3. Pears
4. Grapes
a. Blue
b. White
5. Any Other

SECTION F – Vegetables
1. Beans, Birdegg – 20
2. Beans, Green – 20
3. Beans, Half Runner – 20
4. Beans, Kidney – 20
5. Beans, Lima – 20
6. Beans, Pole – 20
7. Beans, Purple – 20
8. Beans, Soup (hulled) – 20
9. Beans, Wax – 20
10. Beans, Yard Long – 1
11. Beets – 5
12. Broccoli – 1
13. Brussel Sprouts – 10
14. Cabbage, Chinese – 1
15. Cabbage, Flat – 1
16, Cabbage, Pointed – 1
17. Cabbage, Red – 1
18. Cabbage, Round – 1
19. Cabbage, Savory – 1
20. Cantaloupe – 1
21. Carrots – 5
22. Cauliflower – 1
23. Celery – 1
24. Collards
25. Cucumbers, pickling – 6
26. Cucumbers, slicing – 3
27. Dill
28. Eggplant – 1
29. Endive
30. Gourds, Kings Crown – 1
31. Gourds Mixed – 5-8
32. Kohlrabi – 3
33. Lettuce, Leaf
34. Okra – 5
35. Onions, Green – 5
36. Onions, Red – 5
37. Onions, White – 5
38. Onions, Yellow – 5
39. Parsley – 1
40. Parsnips – 5
41. Peanuts – 10
42. Peas – 10
43. Peas, Blackeyed – 10
44. Peas, Chowder – 10
45. Peppers, Sweet, Green – 5
46. Peppers, Sweet, Yellow – 5
47. Peppers, Hot, Green – 5
48. Peppers, Hot Yellow – 5
49. Pumpkins, Cashaw – 1
50. Pumpkins, Field – 1
51. Pumpkins, Pie – 1
52. Radishes, Red – 5
53. Radishes, White – 5
54. Radishes, Winter – 5
55. Rhubarb – 5
56. Rutabagas – 3
57. Salsify – 5
58. Spinach
59. Squash, Acorn – 1
60. Squash, Butternut – 1
61. Squash, Hubbard – 1
62. Squash, Caserta – 1
63. Squash, Crookneck – 1
64. Squash, Scallion – 1
65. Squash, Spaghetti – 1
66. Squash, Straightneck – 1
67. Squash, Zucchini – 1
68. Sweet Corn, White, husked – 5
69. Sweet Corn, Yellow, husked – 5
70. Sweet Potatoes, White – 5
71. Sweet Potatoes, Yellow – 5
72. Swiss Chard – 1
73. Tomatoes, Decorative – 10
74. Tomatoes, Italian – 5
75. Tomatoes, Orange – 5
76. Tomatoes, Red – 5
77. Tomatoes, White – 5
78. Tomatoes, Yellow – 5
79. Turnips – 5
80. Watermelon – 1
81. Mixed Vegetable Display
82. Vegetable Oddity – 1
83. Any Other

SECTION G – Eggs
1. Dozen Eggs, Blue
2. Dozen Eggs, Brown
3. Dozen Eggs, White

SECTION H – Largest Specimen
Entries in this section will be judged on size alone. Quality will not be considered. Items are of general interest to visitors only and are not for the purpose of encouraging production of oversize, poor quality products.
1. Apple
2. Butter Bean
3. Cabbage
4. Cashew
5. Cucumber
6. Peach
7. Pepper
8. Potato, Irish
9. Potato, Sweet
10. Pumpkin
11. Radish
12. Squash, Summer
13. Squash, Winter
14. Sunflower, Head
15. Sunflower, Tallest
16. Tallest Stalk of Corn
17. Tomato, Red
18, Tomato, Yellow
19. Any Other